Parsley Companions

Parsley is probably the most frequently used of all of the culinary herbs. Our companion planting guide will help you decide the best place to grow parsley in your garden to benefit the parsley, other plants and aid with insect control.

Growing Parsley

(Carum Petroselinum, Linn.)

Parsley Plant

Parsley Plant

Along with our guide for companion planting with herbs, Our Herb Garden has this parsley companion planting guide.

Parsley is perhaps one of the most used herbs and probably the one most gardeners want to try. After all, there’s nothing like a few fresh parsley leaves to perk up any dish. When used in conjunction with our guide to growing parsley, even the beginning backyard herb gardener should have success in growing parsleys.

Parsley Companion Planting

When growing chives, carrots, corn, chili and sweet peppers, onions, peas, roses and tomatoes plant parsley nearby. Asparagus is believed to be particularly benefited when companion planted with parsley.

Companion planting parsley with mint or lettuce is a bad idea.

Parsley & Roses.

Planting parsley at the base of your roses will increase their fragrance.

Parsley & Insects.

Swallowtail Caterpillars on a Parsley Plant

Swallowtail Caterpillars on a Parsley Plant

Parsley plants are a favorite of swallowtail butterfly caterpillars. Growing parsley in your garden will attract butterflies. Adult swallowtails will lay their eggs on the leaves therefore, parsley does not have to be flowering to attract butterflies to your garden.

When allowed to go to seed, parsley will attract hoverflies to your garden. With some species of hoverflies, the larvae are known to eat aphids, thrips and other destructive insects.

Parsley is believed to repel harmful beetles.

Additional Parsley Information

(Carum Petroselinum, Linn.)

To learn more about growing parsley be sure to check out our parsley fact sheet.

Parsley has a long and interesting history which can be read on our parsley history page.

Don’t confuse parsley root with the herb parsley (Carum Petroselinum, Linn.). They are both in the carrot family, as are anise, fennel, cumin and caraway, but they are two distinctive plants.